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Battle Cry
"Am I therefore become your enemy, because I tell you the truth?" Gal. 4:16

Christian Music Star Deceived by Bible Confusion
Issue Date: July/August 2010

Failure to have a Bible you can trust has led a popular Christian music artist to believe her sin is not spoken against in the Bible. Jennifer Knapp recently “came out” as a lesbian.

In justifying her 8-year affair with another woman, she questioned the interpretation of the Bible that homosexuality is a sin.

She recently appeared on the Larry King Live program along with an evangelical pastor from San Diego, Bob Botsford. While Pastor Botsford kept coming back to the Bible as proof that homosexuality was a sin, Knapp insisted that that was not the only interpretation of the Bible on the subject. Was she just trying to dodge the issue or did she have valid reasons for her statement?

Her confusion can be traced directly to the multiple versions of the Bible and how they contradict each other, says author David W. Daniels.

For several hundred years, the word “sodomites” was a standard term for those who engaged in same-sex behavior. It was even written into the laws that described this behavior as illegal and punishable by law. You can trace the use of this word to the King James Bible where the honest reader knew it meant homosexual perversion, abhorred by God.

However, the word is missing from most of the modern Bible versions. Instead, words like, “male cult prostitutes” (1 Kings 14:24 NASB) or “homosexual offenders” (1 Cor. 6:9 NIV) are substituted. Homosexuals today say, “That’s not us. Those were idol worshippers.” Or “We are not offenders, we were made this way.”

Is it any wonder that people like Jennifer Knapp would be confused? When people do not believe that they have the “sure word of God,” they are free to interpret it to support whatever they want to believe.

After years of research, author David W. Daniels has captured the essentials of the Bible version debate. In his book, Did The Catholic Church Give Us the Bible? he divides the history of the New Testament into two streams of manuscripts.

He shows how both originated with the writings of the apostles. In one stream, faithful copyists produced exact copies of the originals for general distribution. As the gospel spread to other nations, translations were required. These were done by faithful believers using the carefully done copies. Over the centuries, these were carried west and culminated in the King James Version, widely published in the English world. God used it to call sinners to repentance during the great revivals that spawned the Reformation. For over 300 years its linguistic beauty was the standard for the English language.

The other stream has a less glorious history. Copies of the apostle’s writings arrived in Alexandria, Egypt which was a hotbed of intellectual debate. To them this was not the sacred words of God, but just another something to chew on. They sliced and dissected the gospel, adding a little here and taking out something there.

The existing manuscripts preserved from this stream show thousands of differences even among themselves. But when compared to the northern stream, the alterations show serious damage to the truth. Yet this stream became the source of the modern Bible versions.

Daniels’ three books, Answers to Your Bible Version Questions, Did the Catholic Church Give Us the Bible? and Look What’s Missing, provide simple evidence for any serious Bible believer that he can stake his eternal destiny on the King James Version.

The other versions may be called bibles, but contain serious flaws that can lead to fateful deceptions such as displayed by Jennifer Knapp. We dare not trust our eternal destiny to anything other than the proven Words of God.

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