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Battle Cry
"Am I therefore become your enemy, because I tell you the truth?" Gal. 4:16

Soaked Eucharist Grows ‘Heart Tissue’
Issue Date: November/December 2011


Roman Catholic wafer worship took a bizarre turn in Poland recently. In 2008, a consecrated Eucharist (communion wafer) was accidentally dropped on the floor during a Mass. After the wheat wafer is prayed over (consecrated) by an ordained priest, it is believed to be changed into the actual “body, blood, soul, and divinity” of Jesus.

So when this wafer fell, it was a serious event. There “Jesus” was, lying helpless on the floor. Obviously, one cannot just pick him up and go on by inserting him into someone’s mouth. That would be unsanitary. On the other hand, this was “God” there on the floor.

Official procedure varies about what to do next. Some suggest that a priest should, indeed, pick him up and eat him. Another approach is to pick him up and save him somewhere until after Mass and then wash him down a special sink that drains directly into the ground instead of the common sewer.

However, if a crumb (or several) is visible on the floor after retrieving it, a linen cloth is to be placed over the spot and then the place is to be washed after Mass. In the case in Poland, another procedure was followed. The wafer was placed in water to dissolve it. However, a few days later, it was still somewhat intact and a red spot had appeared on it. This caused a stir among the faithful, and two doctors were asked to examine the spot. Low and behold, they claimed their tests indicated heart muscle tissue! Since the wafer had been made into “Jesus,” then the tissue must be Jesus’ own heart.

This “miracle” required a special celebration. The Associated Press reported that: “The dark-spotted wafer was carried aloft in a reliquary by a golden-robed priest in a procession and was put on display in the town’s church of St. Anthony as about 1,000 faithful looked on, according to a report and footage carried by the TV station TVN.” Subsequent Masses were held to further honor the miracle.

This modern news item refutes the claim that Roman Catholicism has renounced its idolatry and now should be welcomed into the fellowship of believers.

Converted Priest, Charles Chiniquy, in his book, 50 Years in the “Church” of Rome, describes how other types of mishaps with this wafer-god led to great consternation by the “faithful.”

Once, when a fellow priest was carrying a consecrated wafer in its special container to deliver it to an ill parishioner, he got in a fight during a snow storm with a protestant who refused to drive his horses into the ditch and allow the priest carrying the “good god” to pass. The wafer in its container ended up in a snow drift and was not found until the spring thaw. In fact, it was never found, since it had melted away inside the box.

Another time, a misplaced wafer box was found by a curious child who opened it, dropping the wafer into a chamber pot. Chiniquy’s description of the agony of guilt of the child’s family is heart wrenching. 

Rome’s perversion of the last supper ordinance illustrates why the Reformers called Roman Catholics “idol worshippers.” The unbiblical practice of claiming the consecrated wafer to be Jesus Himself and then eating him as a “re-sacrifice” for sin, is pagan idolatry at its finest.

Chiniquy provides one of the most convincing contrasts between Rome’s unscriptural traditions of men and the pure, biblical, commandments. (See Matt. 15:3.) Chiniquy’s journey from a faithful, but deceived, Vatican priest, to glorious freedom in Christ is a powerful story highly useful in helping other Roman Catholics escape from bondage to the pope.

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